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assad, and then a discussion on the future of u.s. energy policy. at 11:00 p.m., "q&a" with timothy naftali, former director of the nixon presidential library. >> studentcam video and trees are now do, friday, january 18, for your chance at the ground prize -- the grand prize. for more information, go to studentcam.org. >> in a rare address to the nation, syrian president bashar al assad talked about moving forward but made no mention of stepping down. he proposed a new constitution, which he said would have new laws. he thanked russia and china for their support of syria and stressed that his country would defend itself against outside forces. the last time the syrian president addressed was in 2012. this comes to was courtesy of aljazeera english. -- comes to us. >> and this is the first time since november that the president has given a public address in his own country. [crowd chanting] not so long after, it was said that maybe as many as 60,000 people have lost their lives in during the course of the 21- month conflict. while our translators are standing by to bring you -- pres
shift products that are vital to our way of life. be abundant and affordable supplies of energy from shale oil both natural gas and oil are driving job creation and economic growth clear across the country. .. producing more domestic energy provides opportunity for the u.s. to increase exports and serve new market. the recent new economic consulting study from the department of energy concludes an exporting is a net benefit in all scenarios evaluated and more exports increase those benefits. just a few years ago, as we all know, we were considering lmj terminals to import natural gas to the united states. what a difference a few short years make. by developing new technology to access potential new sources like oil shale, which often goes not talked about, we will be able to dramatically increase our energy potential and role as the global energy leader. oil shale in the western united today is estimated at 800 billion barrels, which is nearly three times the proven oil reserve of saudi arabia. as the numbers clearly show, we in the industry are investing in america's future. an
gerard says energy is fundamental to america's future, and more domestic production only translates into more economic growth, jobs and government revenue. his comments came during the apis annual state of energy address tuesday here in washington, d.c. after his remarks mr. gerard took part in a q&a session with the audience and members of the press. this is about an hour 18 minutes. >> thank you, marty, and thank you, ladies and gentlemen, for being here today. we are honored by your presence, and greatly appreciate your participation. happy new year to each one of you. and i look around the room, i see a number of distinguished guests. in washington everyone is distinguished, as we all know, and we would like to take the time to introduce everyone. however, in the interest of time we can do that today. though knowing as i look at many of you here today, knowing that many of you have a key role in the energy policy debate, and hopefully what might happen over the next year or two as we consider the truly game changing opportunity we have here in the united states, as it relates to
look at many of you here today, knowing many of you have a key role in energy policy today, and hopefully what might happen over the next year or two as we consider the truly game changing opportunity we have here in the united states as it relates to energy. before i proceed and share remarks with you, i would like to introduce our friends at the head table today. i would like to begin with a new great cheerleader of energy that has come to the united states senate from the state of north dakota. senator, would you stand, please? [laughter] [applause] i think i finally found someone who is a bigger cheerleader than i am. we look forward to working with you. she is truly an expert in the area of oil and natural gas. she has been the tax commissioner and the state attorney general. she knows the industry well. let me quickly go around and introduce others. walter, if you would please stand. walt is the general president of the iron workers union. let me introduce doug. he is the president of the united brotherhood of carpenters heard we work closely. we have 15 unions now. t
with this energy boom and things going on in housing and maybe manufacturing. we did see in this report some gains in construction. we saw gains in manufacturing. what's your sense? what do you make of this report? >> well, the construction and manufacturing, some was sandy related and some housing related. the only real bright spart was residential construction. that's where the real bang for the dollar is in terms of jobs. that's the place we need to see come back. we continue to see, though, some losses in educational employment at the state and local level and retirees in the postal sector. we have yet to see cutbacks in postal -- the budget for the post office so, that will be a bigger head wind down the road. but we are seeing retirees come out there. the public sector still a drag on the overall numbers. i also think it's important on the health care industry where the surprise on the upside was in nursing and in nursing homes, basically, people -- the 80 and over demographic are the fastest growing demographic today. so you're starting to see that filter through and the contour of the jobs
financial. the u.s. is poised for an economic renaissance with an energy boom and housing and manufacturing. we saw gains in construction and gains in manufacturing. what's your sense, ha do you make of this report? >> the construction and manufacturing. some of it was sandy related and housing market related. last month's construction report. the only real bright spot was residential construction. that's where the bang for the dollar is in terms of jobs, that's the place we need to see come back. we continue to see some losses in educational employment at the state and local level and retirees in the postal sector, we've yet to see the cutbacks in the budget for the u.s. post office, it will be a bigger headwind down the road. we're seeing retirees, so the public sector, still a drag on the overall numbers. the health care industry, the surprise on the upside was in nursing and nursing homes. people, the 80 and over demographic are the fastest-growing demographic today. the flip side of the report, where was the fiscal cliff fears it was in retail. we saw retail fires in december. retail w
, the boom going on in energy in this country would continue. i'm larry kudlow. we'll be right back. [ male announcer ] how can power consumption in china, impact wool exports from new zealand, textile production in spain, and the use of medical technology in the u.s.? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. with investment information, risks, fees and expenses i've always had to keep my eye on her... but, i didn't always watch out for myself. with so much noise about health care... i tuned it all out. with unitedhealthcare, i get information that matters... my individual health profile. not random statistics. they even reward me for addressing my health risks. so i'm doing fine... but she's still going to give me a heart attack. we're more than 78,000 people looking out for more than 70
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and energy companies, how many more legs to keep on going? when you look at the transference of wealth from the rich to the poor, how long can this be sustained? >> i think it should be able to go on. chavez himself always every year would come up with an amazing development. the last one was to emphasize on housing. housing was always a serious program. he put through a program to build houses for the poor. i think a new president will have a difficulty coming up with these sorts of new ideas. i think essentially venezuela has been digesting all of these changes. obviously that has been a lot of nationalization, but it is still true that france has a larger public sector van venezuela, which is a statistic we always ignore. >> thank you very much, indeed, for joining us of the program. bush fires are still burning in australia. fire crews are trying to deal with 120 of them in the southeast of the country. they already destroyed tens of thousands of hectares of land and livestock die. meteorologist one extreme high temperature and winds are likely to return. >> from the ground and from the
after the energy industry. whether they can get that done or not. that's to be determined. but there's some real sector implications as to how we see this austerity measures coming together. >> good point. thanks, gentlemen. we appreciate it. we'll be watching the markets ahead of earnings for sure. >>> more than 250 retail executives rub elbows at the womens summit in new york. amazon shares hitting a record high. but a traditional retailer stock not doing so well today. courtney reagan has more on this story. over to you. >> thanks. retail in focus both in the markets today and here with the womens wear daily ceo summit. today the s&p index outperforms the bench mark. but shares of jcpenney falling more than 4% as ron johnson spoke here to a packed room. though it was close to media, we know the insiders were tweeting he spoke about lessons learned. both from the transition he's going through from retailer as well as former boss steve jobs. we don't now how the holiday turned out for jcpenney. one person we spoke to is very happy with how his merchandise performed at jcpenney. >> w
is continuing to improve. europe seems to be stablizing, and energy prices are steady. big companies at home and abroad are flush with cash and looking for reasons to invest. on the negative side, the recent tax increases resulting from the fiscal cliff deal will hit successful small businesses hard, which will dampen growth and hurt job creation in the first part of the year. as illustrated by the chamber's latest survey of small business members, there is a -- which you should have at your places, there is significant uncertainty over health care, regulations, taxes, and deficits. last week's jobs report was mediocre. only 63% of our eligible work force is even participating, and we don't see much improvement in unemployment through the year. so while our economy may be growing, it is fragile growth and not nearly strong enough to create jobs americans need or to expand their incomes. and now, we face a series of new washington deadlines over the deficit spending, the debt ceiling, sequestration, and a continuing resolution to keep the government running. we also face another domestic and
. which was to go after the new energy technology with hydraulic fracking to use energy to grow economy. trade agenda in the obama administration has been d-e- d-e-a-d. dead. there is a conversation that is starting about a trade pack with the european union, smart thing i do. don't you i? >> bob: but they don't want to buy anything. >> andrea: why? >> dana: why do you want to be more like them? >> andrea: we have come full circle. they don't have money. why? they have been giving handout to all the people. mention at early ages 43 years old and beyond. they give out national healthcare. you say obamacare isn't nationalized healthcare but it's structured to end up that way in the end game. looks what happens in greece. no money to pay for prescriptions to give people -- they can't give prescriptions. >> bob: i don't disagree about europe. i think it's, the mediterranean particularrously a basket case. we don't want it to be like that. on the left. no interest. >> eric: the difference between europe and america is zo far are the tax rates. in europe, you are taxed in excess of 50% to fra
is the dramatic cash flow. energy costs down in the united states, that matters. the saudi plan is finally kicking in. and, you know, this is a cash on hand story. they've really developed a situation where they've brought some labor costs down. they had a pension contribution. always difficult. $1.9 billion cash, they only have one piece of debt due in 2013. this is a much better story. again -- >> i want the bigger takeaways. i care about it, but i don't care that much. i want to care more about what it says -- >> i think that's a great point. the answer is, europe's not getting that much worse. you know, if you were a calculus guy, you would say the rate-to-rate exchange is greater. if we have a problem with the debt ceiling. china is straight up. what is klaus's view on china? he thinks the new regime came in and said, you know what, we've been way too tight, way too worried about inflation. let's put on the jets, infrastructure spend. what i think they're developing in china, and i candidly get this from klaas, it's a sewer situation. i know that sounds strange. but literally they've got to d
information about the kinds of injuries and what sort of energies and what are the source of the injuries? it kind of reminded me in a meeting yesterday. i was around in the 1970's. the only guy who can remember this -- i hope i am not insulting him -- is ray lahood. he remembers the auto industry. he remembers the whole question of traffic safety and highway safety. there was a big fight when i first got in the senate that began in the late 1960 fell through early 1970's. the automobile industry did not want to allow the department of transportation to acquire statistics on the type of accidents that occur. they were not able to literally acquire the information. because the concern was it would lead to calls for some rational regulations for the guardrails for automobiles. i remember when we finally broke through and the department of transportation started keeping misinformation, they found out -- if my memory is correct -- the vast majority of drivers -- the steering wheel damage to their solar plexus, penetrated their upper body cavity, damaged their heart. the reason the industry di
energy. those two got upgrades. that is why you see up arrows. hess up for example, 1%. deutsche bank upgraded them to buy from hold. lori: thank you, nicole. we have new evidence sanctions against iran are starting to hurt even as the nation refuses to rein in its nuclear program. melissa: turns out flat rate is going up. what you need to know as the usps raises prices again. at a dry cleaner, we replaced people with a machine. what? customers didn't like it. so why do banks do it? hello? hello?! if your bank doesn't let you talk to a real person 24/7, you need an ally. hello? ally bank. your money needs an ally. at legalzoom, we've created a better place to handle your legal needs. maybe you have questions about incorporating a business you'd like to start. or questions about protecting your family with a will or living trust. and you'd like to find the right attorney to help guide you along, aner any questions and offer advice. with an "a" rating from the better business bureau legalzoom helps you get personalized and affordable legal protection. in most states, a legal plan attorn
cents, energy bear, efy, outperforming today the leveraged etf makes a triple bearish bet on energy market, a trifecta if you like. sandra: a new report out from fannie mae giving a lift to two housing-related plays, sill yo and trillo. 40% of the people think home prices will go up in the new year. >>> earnings season about to kick off. we have an analyst from thomson reuters with three stocks, he said, ashley will beat. he has three stocks that he thinks will beat earnings estimates. they may surprise you. ashley: get a pen and paper. write them down. the college bowl season reaching its pique as noter -- peak as notre dame takes on alabama. would that be better or worse for business though? we'll investigate. sandra: we certainly will. first we'll take, tell you what drove the markets today with today's data download. stocks falling with all three major averages closing lower as investors get ready for tomorrow's start of fourth quarter earnings season, everybody. s&p index retreating from a five-year high to end in the red. utilities and energy was the day's worst-performing sec
up about three points right now. the sectors that are showing strength are staples, energy and technology. back to you. connell: thank you. dagen: the controversial topic of video games and nonviolence. so the government regulate this industry? connell: the chief executive officer of apple says china will some day be his company's biggest arc appeared we will talk or about that as well. speaking of going global, look at some of the currencies around the world. we will be right back. ♪ [ malennouncer ] at scottrade, we believe the more you know, the better you trade. so we have ongoing webinars and interactive learning, plus, in-branch seminars at over 500 locations, where our dedicated support teams help you know more so your money can do more. [ rodger ] at scottrade, seven dollar trades are just the start. our teams have the information you want when you need it. it's anothereason more investors are saying... [ all ] i'm with scottrade. >> announcer: you never know when, but thieves can steal your identity and turn your life upside down. >> hi. >> hi. you know, i casave
, depriving our economy of talented people with the energy and skills needed to drive innovation. we need to renew our tradition of attracting new citizens to our state, and we need to help our young people stay here, raise their own families here, and remain part of the future of new hampshire. [applause] cut in state support for public education in half while lowering the tobacco tax two years ago was shortsighted. [applause] it hurt our young people and, if not quickly addressed, will impair our future economic prosperity. we must begin to reverse course. in exchange, the university system, working with us, needs to increase the number of new hampshire students admitted to our state colleges and universities and freeze in state tuition. [applause] we must also recognize that not every student chooses the same path, and that our community college system has developed innovative, nimble and cutting-edge programs to educate our citizens. we must continue to support their efforts to build the strong workforce that our citizens need. [applause] i have always believed strongly in the power a
master while recording my debut album. how you ask? with 5-hour energy. i get hours of energy now -- no crash later. wait to see the next five hours. >>> the relief, finally had positive action today, but we all know with the battles over the debt ceiling, we could be looking at some very difficult moments over the next couple of months. and that's why all week we've been focusing on the noneconomic big jpmorgan health care conference that started on monday, where biotech and pharma countries strut their stuff. acor, this is a small billion dollar biopharma firm focused on neurology. back in 2010, accorda received approval for a drug called empira that helps people with multiple sclerosis gain their ability to walk. talk about how horrible this disease is, but it is also a lucrative disease for those who are trying to combat it, why? because it's a lifelong chronic condition. at this point, though, acorda has gotten all the low-hanging fruit. the really impressive thing about this story is they could have multiple indications. that's the holy grail of the drug business. right now
hate it when you say that. but look, bonds offer very little value. i use lindco and lind energy as an example. versus some of the real estate investment trusts. medical and health care. there's a lot of bond alternatives. you don't have to be stopped. >> even a dividend yielder like j & j. >> j & j is so undervalued. stock up 7% to 8% last year? with a stroke of a pen they could get that stock to 80, just by breaking it up. put together by someone who, frankly, i know is revered, weldon. there's no reference here for it. >> what is the ten-year -- what is the yield on the ten-year have to get to before we decide that the great rotation is in the midst of happening from bonds to stocks? >> i would have told you when a dividend -- >> now? >> when we thought the tax was going to go to 40%, i would have said, you know, it goes up a half a percent, that's fine. but look, dividends were preserved. we never talk about how big that was, the dividend -- >> enormous. >> it's led to a lot of buying in the last few days. people said, oh, i've got to sell those stocks. even the worst ones ha
is continuing to improve. europe seems to be stabilizing, and energy prices are steady. big companies at home and abroad are flush with cash, and looking for reasons to invest. on the negative side, the recent tax increases resulting from the fiscal cliff deal will hit successful small businesses hard, which will dampen growth and hurt job creation in the first part of the year. elicited by the chamber's latest survey of small business members, which you should have at your place, there is significant uncertainty over health care regulations, taxes and deficits. last week's job report was mediocre. only 63% of our eligible workforce is even participating, and we don't see much improvement in unemployment throughout the year. so while our economy may be growing, it is a fragile growth, and not nearly strong enough to create the jobs americans need, or to expand their income. and now we face a series of new washington deadlines over deficits, spending, debt ceiling, sequestration, and a continuing resolution to keep the government running. we also faced other domestic and international uncertai
. an still is technology, a little bit in financial, materials and energy. >> tom: growth and optimism there from u.s. trust. it's chris hizy with us from new york. >> tom: in just a few weeks the debate over government spending cuts will heat up. the defense industry is one of those targeted, and today president obama nominated former rebublican senator chuck hagel as his next secretary of defense. hagel is a decorated vietnam veteran and former businessman. the president called him, "the leader our troops deserve." >> as a successful businessman he also knows that even as we make tough fiscal choices, we have to do so wisely, guided by our strategy, and keep our military the strongest fighting force the world has ever known. >> tom: hagel's not a shoe-in for the position. he's received criticism for his record on israel, iran, and gay rights. current defense secretary leon panetta says he will retire when his replacement is approved by the senate. >> tom: tonight we begin a new weekly series here on nbr. we partnered with some of the nation's top universities to bring you the best re
's turning. are there other sectors like energy other other places that you think are fun to be in a good position? >> you know, when i comes to things like energy and commodities, i like to look for the companies either that are able to get the stuff from here to there or are figuring out how to get away without using quite so much of it. the obvious energy names, i think that's pretty well done. although i can't comment to be an expert on the names in the sector. house sg on its way back. and then you may start wanting to look for, you know, who benefits in the second derivative from those -- from the strength we're going to see in the housing market. >> other key themes, yesterday we is spoke with byron lein who gave us a list of predictions. one of them was the energy sector who said because you're going to see so much more production, you could see a drop in oil to $70. >> that's the privilege of watching this on an airplane yesterday. i saw byron's interview. and i know he came off pass mystic. remember there are some powerful, marginal players in the energy market. we need energy p
're experimenting, you also have energy projects. again, we have an article in the world in 2013 about the extraordinary reduction in cost of solar power, for example, something similar to solar panels. >> there is a china law which is china sort of overproduces to the point of bankruptcy. that is why the panel is so low. it's close. >> do you see technology transforming our energy situation? >> although it's controversial, the fact of the matter is we should give credit to the people who invented these new forms of oil and natural gas drilling generally known as fracking, hydraulic fracking and so forth. those are resources that help us find pore of this stuff. we can have a discussion about recommendation and so forth. it's very controversial. that has materially changed the economic structure of energy in america. if you take a look at conservation and renewables which i think is ultimately the right answer, what you see now is the automation and instrumentation of passive systems, it changes everything. it goes under the term of smart building. roughly 40% of the carbon emissions t
. it is very hard to get there without destroying the economy. we are proposing a third bucket. it is energy. we have it more than anyone in the world now. we traded 1.75 million jobs in fracking natural gas alone. there is great opportunities for us to put people to work. we can bring cash to the federal government. this is the way to put it together. we have the ability to do it. the states are doing it. we have to open up some federal land. we have to get the permitting process right. we have to get people to understand this is being done in an environmentally friendly way. we have to go offshore, we have to go to alaska, we have to be, energy economy. connell: thoughts on jack lew. it is an important nomination. >> jack lew is an accomplished professional. he has been the head of omb twice. he has been the chief of the white house staff. my favorite is you work for the speaker of the house. he understands congress. we think jack is a guy you can work with. connell: no big concerns about anything in the past from him? >> no. jack is a tough though though she had her, but the bottom line i
and energy, not only for this year but the next three to five years out. i think financial services deserves also a close look as well with many healthy financial services companies and, of course, what they have done to de-leverage. would i say those three areas before i would look at and focus on with high marks towards energy and some telecom as well. information technology. >> all right, jeff? >> yeah. we like large-cap stocks and in particular we like technology materials and energy. in particular we're actually adding to international markets. we think the valuation is more attractive than the u.s. markets so we think europe is another place we can put money to work. >> gordon, do you see any areas not participating that are warning signs to you or that are opportunities where you can still get in at this point? >> well, one of the things that i've been looking for is a question of whether this whole business of austerity and cutting back is going to have such a detrimental effect that you won't see growth in things like materials and infrastructure overall. i haven't seen that so i th
. friday, a five-year high. know we don't have a lot of energy, but i'm not that worried about it right now. see a bigger drop before people got concerned. upside, boeing having a lot of problems. airlines, all up today. the numbers have been great. fares up and revenue trends stable and fuel prices are stable. we've got a potential deal out there with u.s. air, and -- and amr out there, so the important thing is good news for the airlines in general. all the jewelry companies having a great day. cignet great sales, most jewelry stores to the upside. telecoms on the weak side. pcs had very weak subscriber figures though that was during the trading day yesterday. a little strange about the fact that they are all down today. finally, guys, you were talking about whether or not we'll have good numbers on the earnings front and whether the weak earnings are baked. in doing the same thing again, guys. brought the numbers down really, really low. 3% growth in the 500 so far this quarter. down from 12%, 13%. they are going to beat these numbers once again and so the bulls will argue that once agai
. there will likely be no large-scale initiative on tax reform, entitlement reform, energy policy, probably even immigration reform and this is the real worry. because beyond the self-inflicted crisis of the cliff and the forthcoming debt ceiling, the united states faces a much deeper challenge. for more than a decade now, for many decades by some measures, america's growth rates have slowed. recoveries have been jobless. and median wages have declined. some combination of the information revolution and globalization has placed tough pressures on high-wage countries like the united states. these new forces of technology and globalization are accelerating and without a strategy to revive growth, long-term growth, all our problems get worse, including and especially our debt. washington's focus so far has been on raising taxes and cutting spending. it should really be on reforming and investing in the american economy. historically when the american government or the world bank or the imf advised countries that got into trouble, they usually stress that achieving fiscal stability, austerity was on
the sun shines is his grave. it is so like jefferson to soak up every last hour, every moment of energy and enlightenment. what do we make of this man who was so eager to embrace the day, to enjoy and to endure as long as he did. we have to see him for what he was. he was a working politician. here is what george washington wrote to jefferson and hamilton in their relatively rough early days in the cabinet, in the 1790s, when as jefferson put it we were daily pitted in the cabinet like two cox at each other's throats. here is washington. how unfortunate that while we are encompassed on all sides with avowed enemies and insidious friends that internal dissensions should be tearing our vitals. very non washington, very vivid phrase. john adams in the same era of the same year said jefferson's mind is poisoned with passion, prejudice and faction. hamilton said of jefferson, this is how well the work, hamilton said of jefferson that anyone who cares about the liberty of the country or welfare of the nation should look with great despair on jefferson's ascendance to the presidency and jeffer
in a relatively short time. the first contract with energy companies have been signed. while billions are being spent to bail out the banks, many indebted families feel they have been abandoned. >> seven months ago, we applied for social welfare relief. we have not had an answer yet. >> antonin solaris as a bit of money driving a taxi. he says the streets are becoming more and more empty. most people do not shop or go out anymore. he sees only occasional demonstrations against austerity measures. he says he wishes he could turn back the clock sometimes. >> i should not have taken out so many loans, and i should have been more careful with my money. i tell youngsters like my son to watch how they spend their money. they are going to have it tough. they have to learn that they cannot have everything they want. >> low taxes, cheap credit, and ill-thought and russian gains boosted the island's economy for a number of years. now tens of thousands of indebted separates are on the brink of ruin, like the ballerino of nicosia. >> the separate president has blamed expose banks for his country having to
like the euro and the transformation of germany's energy industry to make people think that he is the alternative that they need. >> what about the role being played by the smaller parties? people are already looking at things in terms of possible coalition make ups. how do you think this will shake out? >> the real question is will the junior coalition partner make it back into the bundestag after the election? they are very divided on the moment, particularly on the question of who should lead them, and it looks like voters will punish them by withdrawing support. the greens, on the other hand, have been riding high. there has been talk of a combination, but i think there's too much opposition to that. perhaps the result will be a renewed grand coalition. it has been tried before. it was a success last time under angela merkel, and crucially, the polls suggest most germans would like to see that happen. >> thank you very much. >> techies are in their glory this week, taking in the latest innovations on review at the annual consumer electronics show in las vegas, nevada. >> if
intoxicated by her beauty and her youthfulness and her energy, yet in this picture she comes across as rather a ghostly and strange figure with this rather wild hair and directly staring face. so my own view is it's a bit of a missed opportunity to portray how she is now, this embodiment of hope in the nation. had there been good royal trait. there's the problem with it used to ground to a halt with the 17th century and we had relentless succession of royal portraits. of course part of the reason for that is access so you can't be a royal portraitist if you're granted two short sessions with your subjects, which i believe is what happened here. so it's part of a long tradition that failed. >> if you had some say, who would you have got to paint her? >> well, i think the perfect artist for this would be david hockly who is an artist so experienced and so good at capturing a very beautiful woman, though you wouldn't necessarily know that from this picture. she captured not only youthfulness, but portraits from the duchess of cambridge would capture what she is now. rather than this prematurely
of the day's other headlines. five stories, one minute. first up china is betting on solar energy. the country's top economic planning official says china plans to more than double solar capacity this year and to 10 gigawatts solar power capacity. >>> amazon is planning to open a one million square foot fulfillment center in new jersey. the new facility expected to open early next year and it will create hundreds of jobs. we need them. >>> target is pledging to match prices of select online rivals, sorry around the nation's second largest discounter, will match deals customers find on identical products all the time. i think that was year-round. ashley: it was year-round. sandra: gotcha. samsung expects record high fourth quarter profits. the company sate operating profit would be $8. billion and beating estimates up 89% from a year earlier. >>> anheuser-busch is promoting a new buyer at super bowl for the second year in a row. the beer giant pushing budweiser black crown plan. expected to be on sale nationwide january 21st [buzzer] ashley: you made it. sandra: ashley will try it
demand is growing, the oil price may act as a break in the world economy. the energy revolution will have a global impact in oil flows toward asia. and the global shift is underpinned by huge energy investments. we are going to be talking about u.s. energy. >> yeah -- exactly. we're also seeing reports about how u.s. oil import will be at the lowest in 25 years. there is a change afoot. >> i guess that's what the iea head is saying, asia is going to take more of the u.s. demand. >>> to earnings. yes, alcoa swung to a fourth quarter profit matching forecasts. results were helped by stabilizing raw aluminum prices. higher prices and cost cutting. revenues down 1.5% to $5.9 billion. that did beat estimates. alcoa is also slightly boosting its 2013 global demand forecast from 6.5% to 7%. kleinfeld says growth in china is coming back and europe is doing better than expected. the stock up 1.3% in after hours. in frankfurt, up 1.72%. join for the first hour, for the first time this year, charlie diebel. hello. good to see you. right. here we are. we've kicked off earnings season. what do you mak
it be steel companies, energy costs are down. southwest air, i never recommend airlines anywhere, but you see them going up. raw costs being down, natural gas staying low. really nice offset to what washington can do. by the way, norfolk southern. look at the transports. southwest air. you have the federal express. this stock is breaking out. that's an asian play. norfolk southern had just been the anchor. truckers are still problematic. but if you can see coal shipments going up, because it's an incredibly cold winter in china, you'll have some surprises in transports. >> energy, in terms of the key costs, going down potentially. maybe that answers the question of some who say, hey, margins have been so high for so long, we're not going to have significant revenue growth this year if we get a 2% gdp number. can we really expect margin of improvement this year, and what kind of multiple do these earnings deserve moving through 2013. >> wells fargo talking about georgia gold. when you hear new housing, listen up. housing is the story, other than what phil lebeau was talking about last week. au
, quirky and fun. >> talking about new things, new ways that you're experimenting, you also have energy projects. again, we have an article in the world in 2013 about the extraordinary reduction in cost of solar power, for example, something similar to solar panels. >> there is a china law which is china sort of overproduces to the point of bankruptcy. that is why the panel is so low. it's close. >> do you see technology transforming our energy situation? >> although it's controversial, the fact of the matter is we should give credit to the people who invented the new forms of oil and natural gas drilling generally known as fracking, hydraulic fracking and so forth. those are resources that help us find pore of this stuff. we can have a discussion about recommendation and so forth. it's very controversial. that has materially changed the economic structure of energy in america. if you take a look at conservation and renewables which i think is ultimately the right answer, what you see now is the automation and instrumentation of passive systems, it changes everything. it goes under the
energy -- >> look, we're at a moment where i don't think anybody who's got a mortgage, they know they're getting a good price. the ohio regionals are going to do better. that welgs is now a sale. look, wells could go to 33. if it had been to 32, it will go to 33. it ran to $35.40, and the group got ahead of itself. but remember, this is a temporary problem. you have millions of people coming on air every day saying, the fed's going to have to raise rates. if that's the case, wells fargo is your number one stock. >> meanwhile, is american express adding to what morgan stanley has done, what citi has done, and that is trimming their work force. in this case, you could probably argue by a more significant level, right? >> and for different reasons, yes. >> that's really the pressure from the digitization of the travel business as opposed to morgan stanley. the digits getting smaller and smaller in terms of the profit margins there. >> i was thinking, you know, i remember thinking taking trips with my father in the '70s, you couldn't travel around the world without american express travel
a specific solution that we were recommending. >> they were seeking to acquire the american energy companies. how do we ensure that nasa's research talent pool and facilities are not required by the foreign interests that may be harmful to our national interests? i guess they would direct that. >> that wasn't addressed in our study in terms of the foreign ownership of the company's credit spigot you've written that the infrastructure capability no longer needs would this be included and what can be purchased by the foreign countries? >> i don't recall that we specified or considered in the deliberations the number the would be a potential buyer. i do want to give you an example of the visit that i made in ohio where the have a large chamber of separations and a great facility. some of the missions needed that, but it is a facility that also has the capacity for other work and so, they had looked at doing some of the work in that facility and they were also discussing to do work in that facility so it would be some aspects may be appropriate for a sale but others may be greater utilization of
it was a turn in the housing market. it was cheap energy and an improvement in u.s. manufacturing. but nevertheless, i think you are seeing for fundamental reasons have pretty good strength in the u.s. >> well, that was jim's view. chris, what do you take away from the minutes yesterday? it had a big impact on the dollar, pushing benchmark yields higher, as well. i think we have to be contextualizing what comes out for minute statements compared with headlines. and i think that the real issue has been the fed has decided in the last six months to start actively talking about policy as part of the policy, if you like. it's the giving voice to what's going on. and we've heard a lot more from the fed about what it's anticipating doing in 2013/14. the idea that there's probably a relatively even balance, bear in mind we have new fed members coming in this year, there's a relatively even balance between people that think you should do more accommodate than not. it takes take away the weapons the fed was already working with until we saw the unemployment level coming down to the kind of
and we know enough about how crashes work and how to disburse the energy from a crash that you can make vehicles safer and lighter at the same time if you know how to build them properly. host: independent line. go ahead. caller: i bought a car this year first thank you for c-span. i'm a c-span junky. but i bought a car this year and i really wish that i hadn't because some of these newer cars are very expensive to fix. they have computer chives chips. and if you buy it from a second rate auto dealer or your credit is not that great they jack up the price and they jack up the interest rate and you end up under water with cars that cost more than your car note is to keep on the road. host: could you tell us what you bought and what you paid for it? caller: i bought a 2008 chrysler sea breeze and i paid about 12,000 for it . host: so your monthly works out to about what? caller: about $300. guest: and that is a concern. you're right. buying a car is still can be a very complicated very opaque process. you have to be individual lint pretty much at every step of the way to make sure that yo
states, health care is something that our managers like. energy, more cyclical consumer discretionary leaning a little bit into a cyclical play. don't overshoot it but just lean too it. >> at the same time you guys are only looking for 1,500 on the s&p. we're at 1470 so between now and the end of the year. >> 0 point? >> looking for 30 more points on the s&p. >> coming into this year a lot of volatility is wrapped around that. saw that last year, a rally, pullback, rally, pullback and rally into the end of the year. high single sdajts reasonable expectations for someone having into this market, wrapped with a lot of volatility. get so much more, so much the better, but it will be a cheap ride in our opinion. >> we'll leave it there. gentlemen, thanks so much. great conversation. appreciate it. this market is gaining momentum as we approach the close. let's find out what's behind it from bob pisani. over to you, robert. >> you know what's important. put up the s&p 500, because we're about to close -- if we close at 1469 or so, five-year highs in the s&p, near historic highs, of course,
&p sectors in the green led by financials and energy as ashley just told you. rates meantime, here's a look at the 30-year fixed rate mortgage rising to its highest level in eight weeks. freddie mac reporting 3.4% from 3.34%. the 15-year rate rose to 2.66%. and the number of americans filing new applications for unemployment benefits rising by 4,000 to a total of 371,000. prior week's total was revised lower by 5,,000, splitting hairs quite a bit on the weekly readings, but the bottom line we're still trending toward improvement. ashley: we are hoe humming along. we've got john brady in the pits of the cme, david flyer and jack ablin, chief investment officer of bmo o private bank. let's begin with john at the cme. i guess the story has been china gave the markets a nice boost with much better economic data. has that been the big story? >> it is, it's the number one story. but likewise, too, we saw a tightening back today of european sovereign yield spreads over in europe, italy, spain and portugal specifically. that helped boost overnight markets and, of course, economic data here was rela
a lot of vitamins and everything, and it gave me energy and it kept me out of the doctor's office. i wouldn't know what to do without supple. it has really, really helped me. >> i've had arthritis for, since i was 18, so it makes a big difference. >> what you spend on doctors, the price of supple is worth every nickel, every nickel. >> i started to experience a lot of back pain for the first time in my life when i, when i hit about 40 and it just got worse and worse with the more and more yard work i would do. after just probably about a week or two of drinking the supple, i'd come in from the yard and i'd expect to start to feel pain and there wouldn't be any. and the longer i drank the supple, the longer i could actually stay out in the yard. and i have no pain now. i can garden 8 hours, 2 days in a row and, and i really don't have any pain. >> i cannot recommend something that i do, really do not believe in. and there is nothing better than supple. >> if you're watching right now and you'd like some more information on how to get supple. it's a delicious drink for complete pain re
energy boom we're just in the beginnings of. but washington politics are toxic and getting worse. the debt limit and the frustration will be harder to deal with than the fiscal cliff. as a consequence, the politics in the united states will create some downside. we're not talking about a recession, but numbers in the u.s. could be even better if it weren't for washington looking so dysfunctional. >> tom: that drag of dysfunction in politics. ian bremmer along with us. thank you. >> susie: a big management change at sears: c.e.o. lou d'ambrosio is stepping down in february after less than two years on the job. replacing him: the company's chairman, hedge fund manager eddie lampert. as ruben ramirez reports, lampert's priorities may take sears in a different direction. >> reporter: the revolving door in the c-suite at sears coe tinues. sears chairman eddie lampert will be the new c.e.o. of the company his hedge fund took over in 2005. appel associates president michael appel says whoever ends up running the company will need to have retail in their blood. >> at the end of the day,
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